Resources for a better future

The crises facing us today are political and ecological. Political, because they’re a result of the way our society is run, and can only be addressed by people coming together to do things differently. Ecological, because they are rooted in our failure to take care of, and understand, our home. Unfortunately, so much of the knowledge we’ve developed to understand the world isn’t accessible to most—it gets lost in thick academic language, much of which is never seen by the public. The science communicated in mainstream news outlets is often stripped of its political content—man-made disasters are ‘natural’, environmental degradation happens because there are ‘too many people’. And when social movements come up with concepts—environmental justice, degrowth, land grabbing—they rarely see the light of day, as their demands are sterilized by ‘objective’ reporters. When people look up these terms, a quick Google search rarely provides reliable information.

Resources for a better future

Uneven Earth is starting a new series: ​a glossary of crucial concepts in political ecology, alternative economics, and environmental justice.​ We are calling on experts and activists to help us put out easy-to-read, clear, and opinionated explainers of some of the most important issues. Anyone can write an entry, and we will help with editing to make them readable to wide audiences. The time is now to put forward concise definitions of key concepts, to explain our political position firmly and clearly.

How to submit

If you are interested in writing an entry, please send an email to ​info@unevenearth.org​, with a brief description of your political position, and why you are well-placed to write this entry. Please indicate if you are able to translate your entry into another language. These articles will be published on a rolling basis, as such, there is ​no deadline for submission​. We also encourage authors to stay in contact and update their entries over time.

Uneven Earth editors are unpaid, and while we are currently unable to provide funding or financial compensation for submissions, we are hoping to create the possibility for publication opportunities beyond the website in the future.

Template

We suggest that each entry follows a common template. Aim for a maximum of 1,200 words. Start with a ​short definition​, go on to explain the ​broader debate​, briefly discuss a ​case study​ or relevant example, put forward a ​political position​ on the topic, including criticism and unresolved issues, and list ​further resources ​for interested readers, with a 1-sentence description of each article. Do not use difficult words without defining them. Do not use hyperlinks if you can avoid them. We encourage you to be creative.

Below is a list of suggested terms and concepts, but you are free to suggest your own.

List of possible entries

Agroecology

Anthropocene*

Automation

Buen Vivir

Capitalism

Carbon budgets

Class

Climate justice

Colonialism

Commons*

Conviviality

Decoupling*

Debt

Degrowth*

Dematerialization

Democracy

Development

Discounting

Ecological economics

Ecology

Environmental justice*

Environmental racism

EROI

Externalities

Carbon trading

Extractivism*

Feminism

GDP

Gentrification

Geoengineering

GMOs

Green growth

Growth

Historical materialism

Human nature*

Indigenous

Industrialization

IPCC

Jevons’ Paradox*

Land grabbing

Migration

Money

Municipalism

Nature

Neoliberalism

Nuclear energy*

Patriarchy

Peak oil

Peasants*

Permaculture

Political ecology*

Politics / the political

Population

Pricing nature

Race

Renewable energy

Resilience

Revolution

Scarcity

Social cost of carbon

Social ecology*

Social metabolism

Soil

Sufficiency

Sustainable development

Systems

Technology

Traditional ecological knowledge

*Entry has already been claimed by an author.